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Dan Goodman's journal

April 3rd, 2007

April 3rd, 2007
07:07 pm

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From the Christian Science Monitor:

Is US Army bent to the breaking point?
If retention rates of US military personnel begin to weaken, it could take years to reverse the trend. By Gordon Lubold
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0404/p01s01-usmi.html?s=hns

Thailand enlists women to battle insurgency
As the conflict deepens in the Muslim-dominated south, women are mobilizing to defend communities and bar government investigators from crime scenes. By Simon Montlake
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0404/p01s01-woap.html?s=hns

Iraq's army seeks a few good Sunnis
Poor turnout at a Sunni neighborhood recruiting drive underscores the challenges facing US military trainers seeking to build a balanced Iraqi force. By Sam Dagher
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0404/p01s01-woiq.html?s=hns

Pakistan's jihadi press problem
Critics claim President Musharraf is cracking down harder on the country's secular media than he is on its radical Islamist press. By David Montero
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0404/p06s01-wosc.html?s=hns
________
From bna.com's newsletter:

FCC IMPOSES RULES TO PREVENT PRETEXTING
The Federal Communications Commission hopes to prevent data burglaries with a set of new regulations for phone companies aimed at preventing the fraudulent practice called "pretexting." On Monday, the FCC issued an order designed to strengthen its current privacy rules by requiring telephone and wireless operators to adopt additional safeguards to protect personal telephone records from being disclosed to unauthorized people.
http://news.com.com/2100-1037_3-6172705.html

EU READY TO PROBE APPLE'S MUSIC PRICING
As three of the world's four biggest music companies
responded coolly to EMI Group PLC and Apple Inc.'s announcement that they plan to sell music online without anticopying software, the European Commission prepared to unveil an antitrust investigation into the music-pricing structure for Apple's iTunes Store. Brussels regulators sent copies of a so-called statement of objections to Apple and the four global music companies last week.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB117551600282556748.html

NET ELECTION BROADCASTS MAY VIOLATE JAPANESE LAW
The postings on the Internet of campaign broadcasts and videos of candidates making street speeches in the Tokyo gubernatorial election, may violate the Public Offices Election Law, local election officials have pointed out. The law sets rules for disclosing images related to election campaigns, but there are no stipulations covering the unauthorized "broadcasting" of campaign speeches on the Internet.
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/20070402TDY02009.htm

CANADA'S PRIVACY COMMISH SAYS SWIFT PROBE DIDN'T VIOLATE LAW
The Privacy Commissioner of Canada has concluded that the United States did not break Canadian law in a post-Sept. 11 terrorism probe, even though Canadians' personal banking information was likely handed over to U.S. authorities. Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart also said in a report released Monday that SWIFT, a Brussels-based financial co-operative that provides messaging services and software to financial institutions in more than 200 countries, did not wrongfully hand over personal data to the U.S. Treasury during Washington's efforts to curb terrorists following the 2001 attacks.
<http://tinyurl.com/2ku3ch> [Globe and Mail]

CANADIAN PHOTOGRAPHER CLAIMS VIOLATION OF CC LICENSE
A Canadian photographer is considering suing a Member of Parliament for using a Creative Commons licensed photograph posted on Flickr in campaign literature. The photographer says he wouldn't have allowed the MP to use his photograph in the first place because he disagrees with "her campaign and political viewpoint."
<http://tinyurl.com/25jvha> [Kamloops This Week]

U.S. INTERNET FRAUD HITS ALL-TIME HIGH
Americans lost a record amount to Internet fraud schemes last year, and the notorious "Nigerian 419" scam is blamed for the largest individual losses. A government report on 2006 Internet crimes also records the sudden emergence of extortionists who use e-mail to deliver ominous threats that grave consequences await unless money is sent. The new federal statistics show that Americans reported losing an all-time high of $198.4 million to Internet fraud in 2006, up 8 percent from 2005 levels of $183 million and 191 percent from 2004 levels of $68 million.
<http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2007/03/31/mngscovggi1.dtl>

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TimeEvent
09:29 pm

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From http://eurekalert.org:

Public Release: 3-Apr-2007
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America
Media bias distorts details of past earthquakes
The story of some violent historic earthquakes may need to be revisited, according to a study published in the April issue of the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. Seismologists rely on written accounts, mostly local newspaper articles, to judge how strongly the ground shook during earthquakes that predate the use of current instrumentation. Those news accounts have proven to be misleading, say scientists, and reliance upon them must be tempered when evaluating the size of past earthquakes.
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-04/ssoa-mbd033007.php

Public Release: 2-Apr-2007
American Naturalist
Male owls pitch their hoots to advertise body weight to competitors
Male owls respond more strongly to the high-pitched calls that simulate lighter individuals, confirming that territorial males attend to pitch information advertising body weight in the calls of their competitors. The authors also found that the territory owners give slightly lower pitched hoots in response to calls mimicking heavier males, probably indicating that they attempted to sound heavier when challenged by more threatening individuals.
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-04/uocp-mop040207.php

Public Release: 2-Apr-2007
American Naturalist
Why are there so many more species of insects? Because insects have been here longer
McPeek and Brown show that many insect groups like beetles and butterflies have fantastic numbers of species because these groups are so old. In contrast, less diverse groups, like mammals and birds, are evolutionarily younger. This is a surprisingly simple answer to a fundamental biological puzzle.
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-04/uocp-wat040207.php

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